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jheneaiko:

word to myself

jheneaiko:

word to myself

(Source: happyblo)

tr-ibal:

I will keep this photo posted for 1 week.
Every time someone Reblogs this photo I will donate 10 cent to charity: water
After the money is donated I will post proof of donation.
Show you care & Reblog.
always

tr-ibal:

I will keep this photo posted for 1 week.

Every time someone Reblogs this photo I will donate 10 cent to charity: water

After the money is donated I will post proof of donation.

Show you care & Reblog.

always

(Source: charitywaterproject, via biiishop)

golden-hoser:

Some of Diego Rivera’s paintings of flower sellers, it depicts the Mexican struggle in such a romantically tragic way. Their backs are broken by one of the most delicate objects; the flower is a symbol of love, growth, and beauty and they are slowly wearing away at these hard working people. It is an interesting juxtaposition of beauty and struggle. Anyways, just thought I would share some more work from my favourite artist on Cinco de Mayo! Ojala que tengan un buen dia! Viva Mexico!

andrewbaggott:

What the Water Gave Me (Lo Que el Agua Me Dio), Frida Kahlo, 1938.
This painting was the inspiration for the title of a Florence + the Machine song on the 2011 album Ceremonials. 

andrewbaggott:

What the Water Gave Me (Lo Que el Agua Me Dio), Frida Kahlo, 1938.

This painting was the inspiration for the title of a Florence + the Machine song on the 2011 album Ceremonials


“Frida right after surgery in 1946 — Coyoacan — she is now worse than ever, the pain is unimaginably intense.” - Taken by her nephew.

“Frida right after surgery in 1946 — Coyoacan — she is now worse than ever, the pain is unimaginably intense.” - Taken by her nephew.

(Source: Washington Post, via theeingenious)

artmastered:

Diego Rivera, Girl with Lilies, 1941

artmastered:

Diego Rivera, Girl with Lilies, 1941

tolteka:

Serenata Mexicana - Jesus Helguera

tolteka:

Serenata Mexicana - Jesus Helguera

jheneaiko:

word to myself

jheneaiko:

word to myself

(Source: happyblo)

tr-ibal:

I will keep this photo posted for 1 week.
Every time someone Reblogs this photo I will donate 10 cent to charity: water
After the money is donated I will post proof of donation.
Show you care & Reblog.
always

tr-ibal:

I will keep this photo posted for 1 week.

Every time someone Reblogs this photo I will donate 10 cent to charity: water

After the money is donated I will post proof of donation.

Show you care & Reblog.

always

(Source: charitywaterproject, via biiishop)

golden-hoser:

Some of Diego Rivera’s paintings of flower sellers, it depicts the Mexican struggle in such a romantically tragic way. Their backs are broken by one of the most delicate objects; the flower is a symbol of love, growth, and beauty and they are slowly wearing away at these hard working people. It is an interesting juxtaposition of beauty and struggle. Anyways, just thought I would share some more work from my favourite artist on Cinco de Mayo! Ojala que tengan un buen dia! Viva Mexico!

andrewbaggott:

What the Water Gave Me (Lo Que el Agua Me Dio), Frida Kahlo, 1938.
This painting was the inspiration for the title of a Florence + the Machine song on the 2011 album Ceremonials. 

andrewbaggott:

What the Water Gave Me (Lo Que el Agua Me Dio), Frida Kahlo, 1938.

This painting was the inspiration for the title of a Florence + the Machine song on the 2011 album Ceremonials


“Frida right after surgery in 1946 — Coyoacan — she is now worse than ever, the pain is unimaginably intense.” - Taken by her nephew.

“Frida right after surgery in 1946 — Coyoacan — she is now worse than ever, the pain is unimaginably intense.” - Taken by her nephew.

(Source: Washington Post, via theeingenious)

(Source: patmylove)

artmastered:

Diego Rivera, Girl with Lilies, 1941

artmastered:

Diego Rivera, Girl with Lilies, 1941

tolteka:

Serenata Mexicana - Jesus Helguera

tolteka:

Serenata Mexicana - Jesus Helguera

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